Putting Microbes to Work

Developing microbial communities to generate clean fuel sources and clean up environmental contaminents

DOE Program Managers
Susan Gregurick
DOE Office of
Biological & Environmental Research
Christine Chalk
DOE Office of
Advanced Scientific Computing Research

The Departmentís missions in energy and environment have focused life science efforts on microbes and microbial communities that have the potential to generate hydrogen or ethanol or to sequester carbon dioxide or environmental contaminents. This field is new to SciDAC and will focus on developing new methods for modeling complex biological systems, including molecular complexes, metabolic and signaling pathways, individual cells and, ultimately, interacting organisms and ecosystems. Such systems act on time scales ranging from microseconds to thousands of years and the systems must couple to huge databases created by an ever-increasing number of high-throughput experiments.

Announced in 2008

New Paradigms for Bioremediation and Energy Production
BACTER: Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Environmental Research
    Principal Investigator: Julie Mitchell (jcmitchell@wisc.edu)
    University of Wisconsin-Madison

Announced in 2007

Renewable Energy: BioEthanol
Understanding the Processivity of Cellobiohydrolase Cel7A (CBH I)
    Principal Investigator: Michael Crowley (michael_crowley@nrel.gov)
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Life Sciences Research Projects Announced in September 2006

Predicting the Function of Proteins for Newly Sequenced Organisms
Algorithms and engineering for gene function annotation for Joint Genome Institute genomes
    Principal Investigator: Steven E. Brenner (brenner@compbio.berkeley.edu)
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Green Energy: Advancing Bio-hydrogen
Developing a model of metaobolism linked to H2 production in green algae
    Principal Investigator: Michael Seibert (mike_seibert@nrel.gov)
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory

 


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